Resin flooring specification - avoiding headaches with the right flooring applicator


Today’s post continues the series I wrote for my decorative resin flooring brand, Floorchef, which was aimed at helping architects, interior designers and other specifiers avoid common flooring specification headaches. 

The previous post saw you choose a specialist brand for your project (Right Flooring Brand); closely linked to which brand is the choice of resin flooring applicator. When it comes to resin flooring, many people think because it’s a liquid and comes in a bucket that anyone with a paint brush can apply it. This couldn’t be further from the truth and the decision on which applicator to use has to be made carefully.

Choose the brand, choose the applicator


Most applicators are loyal to the brand of resin flooring they use because familiarity is a big comfort, so by choosing the brand you also narrow down the choice of applicator in many ways. Does the brand I’m looking at have a strong, visible network of applicators promoting and using their product? Do they have a training or accreditation scheme in place? Is there substantial evidence of quality resin floors being done with this brand?

Don’t “settle” with resin flooring applicators


If that background information checks out, your task is to pick a suitable resin flooring applicator from the bunch. There are some basic rules of thumb that apply to this task, like only using trained applicators (local where possible) and avoiding large application companies on small jobs or vice versa, however the best advice we can give here is to engage with the applicators first. Give them a call for a chat, ask for a profile on them and their work, make sure they are willing to do sampleboards and go that extra yard to deliver the resin floor you want. Overall, don’t feel as though you have to “settle” and only work with someone you feel comfortable with!

Resin flooring sampleboards on display for the customer. Resin flooring over a large warehouse floor with boxes stacked on it.

Whose agenda is it?


Once you’ve made your selection, it might be a good idea to follow up on that choice before commencement if you’re not personally managing the project because whoever you appoint as manager may not have the same agenda as yourself. Their preference may be to work with someone they’ve used before, a cheaper option or even a friend, so last-minute switches are not completely out of the question.

Take care and keep smiling,

Jack